Events

So You Think You Can Dabkeh: Dabkeh Tour of Bay Ridge

Sat, October 6, 2012 7:00 pm at Bay Ridge

(View all so you think you can dabkehs »)

***SOLD OUT***

Start the fall off with a stomp! This dabkeh tour of Bay Ridge is part of So You Think You Can Dabkeh, a festival celebrating and exploring the line dances of the Levant.

Neighborhood dabbikeh introduce you to steps, sounds and stories of dabkeh in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, highlighting its social context and meaning.

The tour begins at Arab American Association of NY where we'll experience dabkeh and other traditions associated with Palestinian henna parties. Henna artist Suhair Mohammed will decorate palms in the styles popular at Brooklyn celebrations. Sheren Attal will share a traditionally embroidered (tatreez) Palestinian thobe worn at henna and wedding parties. All-girl dabkeh troupe, Nejmat Falasteen, demonstrate and teach a few troupe steps.

We’ll include a stop at a local music store to meet a boys dabkeh troupe and hear what's hot in dabkeh music before heading to family bakery, Cedars Pastry, where we'll sample traditional Lebanese pastries served at weddings and learn about dabkeh practices from the village of Anqoun to Brooklyn, NY from store owner Sikna Kabbout.

The night ends at Lebanese Le Sajj restaurant for a meal of mezze, mixed grill, a shisha to sample, live music by Basil Touma and band, and dabkeh dancing of course, to the beat of Jad Lebbos' tabl beladi drum.

Pastries and dinner is included in ticket price.

Tickets: $25 Advance purchase online only

(*A small online fee is applied - use printout as your ticket)

Tour limited to 13 participants. Participants will be informed of a local meeting place in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, via email, once a ticket is purchased.

For more information email nicole@alwanforthearts.org

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About Participating Artists:

Suhair Mohammed is a Bay Ridge based henna artist. Of Yemeni and Guyanese descent, Suhair first lived by Atlantic Avenue before moving to Bay Ridge, where she attended nearby Al Noor High School. It was there, among Pakistani friends and classmates that Suhair began to learn Pakistani henna traditions. After Suhair married in 2010, her mother-in-law in Karachi, Pakistan began shipping natural henna cones to her. Although Suhair specializes in Pakistani design, know for its intricate and detailed patterns, as a Brooklyn based artist, she caters to the borough’s divers population and has learned henna styles from Palestine to Morocco. She decorates palms for henna celebrations, weddings and before special holidays such as the Muslim celebration, Eid il Kibir, where she sets a table at her family 5th Avenue, Bay Ridge boutique, Al Arzak.

Basil Touma grew up singing traditional Lebanese songs at parties, festivals and with his school choir in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli. As a teenager, Touma enrolled in Tripoli's music conservatory to study oud, including classical, traditional and folk styles as well as theory. He went on to work with the internationally renowned Syrian, Sultan al Tarab, Georges Wassouf, for several years. In 1993, Touma came to the U.S. and settled in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn and currently lives over yonder in Staten Island. Touma's repertoire includes Lebanese beladi, traditional mountain folk songs such as the genre referred to as jabali, as well as classical muwashahat, standards sung by Lebanese master Wadi El Safi and more contemporary Lebanese dabkeh such as that of Assi El Helani. Touma regularly performs at nightclubs, parties and festivals in the metro area.

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Alwan for the Arts presents So You Think You Can Dabkeh, a festival celebrating and exploring the line dances of the Levant region of the Middle East through participatory and performative events from September 8 - October 13, 2012. The festival highlights dabkeh’s societal and cultural context, musical complexity and variations, and multiple significations to practitioners in the Levant and here in New York City, where dabkeh is one of the most publicly performed and beloved dance by Arab Americans.

Dabkeh is a music and danced social tradition of the Levant area of the Middle East. As a dance it is performed socially at celebrations, in choreographed floor patterns by troupes, and even in street protests. Dabkeh is rooted in village folk traditions and gatherings: performed in lines and circles, with rhythmic stomping, syncopated foot patterns. The music may involve a cappella vocals, (mawwal), wind instrument (mijwiz, shababe or nay) and a large drum, (tabl beledi).

FESTIVAL EVENTS:

Saturdays, Sept 8-29: Dabkeh Workshops with Ramzi Edlibi

Thursday, Oct 11: Women and Dabkeh: Panel and Party

Saturday, Oct 13 : Dabkeh-Off: Workshop/Demo, Lecture, Competition and Concert

*****

So You Think You Can Dabkeh is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

Last updated: 2012-10-04 16:03:14

Jad Lebbos plays tabl beladi at Le Sajj, 2012. Photo courtesy of Artist
Jad Lebbos plays tabl beladi at Le Sajj, 2012. Photo courtesy of Artist
Designed by Kirtsi Itameri
Designed by Kirtsi Itameri
Namoura is a favorite pastry at weddings and other celebrations where dabkeh is danced.  These are made fresh at Lebanese Cedars Pastry shop in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.  Photo: Nicole Macotsis
Namoura is a favorite pastry at weddings and other celebrations where dabkeh is danced. These are made fresh at Lebanese Cedars Pastry shop in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Photo: Nicole Macotsis

Bay Ridge

To be disclosed by email after purchase
Brooklyn 11209

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